A Monster Calls

monster_callsPatrick Ness
2013
Fiction N463m

Conor is having nightmares. His mother has cancer, his father lives in the United States with his second wife and baby, he doesn’t get along with his grand-mother, and he is being bullied at school. He is holding all his feelings in, but he will be visited soon by a real monster who will come to his aid but not in the way he anticipates.
This is a very touching and imaginative book, full of beautiful black and white illustrations, about coping with loss and finding one’s way in a world that has turned upside down.

Wonderstruck

wonderstruckBrian Selznik
2011
S469w

Set fifty years apart, two independent stories – Ben »s told in words and Rose »s in pictures – weave back and forth with mesmerizing symmetry. How they unfold and ultimately intertwine will surprise you, challenge you, and leave you breathless with wonder.
Ever since his mom died, Ben feels lost.
At home with her father, Rose feels alone.
He is searching for someone, but he is not sure who.
She is searching for something, but she is not sure what.
When Ben finds a mysterious clue hidden in his mom »s room,
When a tempting opportunity presents itself to Rose,
Both children risk everything to find what »s missing.
With over 460 pages of original drawings and playing with the form he invented in his trailblazing debut novel, The Invention of Hugo Cabret, Brian Selznick once again sails into uncharted territory and takes readers on an awe-inspiring journey. Rich, complex, affecting, and beautiful, Wonderstruck is a stunning achievement from a uniquely gifted artist and visionary.
(chapter.indigo.ca)

Zombie in love

zombie_loveKelly DiPucchio
2011
D596z

Mortimer the zombie is lonely and desperately wants a sweetheart, but every time he reaches out to a human girl, disaster strikes. The wormy chocolates disgust, the real heart terrifies, and the ring on a severed finger scares. He just doesn’t seem to have that devil-may-care romantic dash. He places a personal ad, and, on the night of the Cupid’s Ball, he waits and waits for the right girl to arrive. Finally, she does and makes a disastrous entrance, knocking over the punch bowl. She smiles at him with the same Frankensteinlike teeth he has and his heart melts. This silly story features loads of sight gags that sharp-eyed children will enjoy. When the zombie is working out and his arm falls off, chuckles are guaranteed. The color cartoon illustrations are over-the-top, which makes the comic effects even more obvious. This giggler will grab those children who like their zombies funny. (School Library Journal)

Zen Shorts

zenJon J. Muth
2005
M992z

When Stillwater the bear moves into the neighborhood, the stories he tells to three siblings teach them to look at the world in new ways.
This is a very charming and beautifully illustrated book that adults will enjoy reading to young children.

Holes

holesLouis Sachar
2001
FICTION S121h

As further evidence of his family’s bad fortune which they attribute to a curse on a distant relative, Stanley Yelnats is sent to a hellish correctional camp in the Texas desert where he finds his first real friend, a treasure, and a new sense of himself..

When you reach me

whenyoureachmeRebecca Stead
2009
FICTION S799W

Twelve-year-old Miranda, a latchkey kid whose single mother is a law school dropout, narrates this complex novel, a work of science fiction grounded in the nitty-gritty of Manhattan life in the late 1970s. Miranda’s story is set in motion by the appearance of cryptic notes that suggest that someone is watching her and that they know things about her life that have not yet happened. She’s especially freaked out by one that reads: “I’m coming to save your friend’s life, and my own.” Over the course of her sixth-grade year, Miranda details three distinct plot threads: her mother’s upcoming appearance on The $20,000 Pyramid ; the sudden rupture of Miranda’s lifelong friendship with neighbor Sal; and the unsettling appearance of a deranged homeless person dubbed “the laughing man.” Eventually and improbably, these strands converge to form a thought-provoking whole. Stead (First Light ) accomplishes this by making every detail count, including Miranda’s name, her hobby of knot tying and her favorite book, Madeleine L’Engle’s A Wrinkle in Time . It’s easy to imagine readers studying Miranda’s story as many times as she’s read L’Engle’s, and spending hours pondering the provocative questions it raises. Ages 9–14. (Publishers Weekly)